thekilejohnson:

knowledgeequalsblackpower:

90skindofworld:

Carlton dropping some real shit

Carlton Banks on “acting White”

real talk


brasspistol:

every time I see this it gets reblogged

(Source: sandandglass)


blackgirlwhiteboylove:

US found guilty of murdering MLK!

Follow my blog: http://blackgirlwhiteboylove.com


shari-chan:

purringly:

Oxford University students on why we need feminism

Amen

I love feminist men. I like people that stand up equality even though the system bends in their favour.


impandlionheart:

sarapocock:

This happens all the time.  Every car horn, every whistle, every cat call and lewd exclamation, strengthens the lesson I’ve been taught over and over and over again throughout my entire life: as a lady, my body is on public display and open for judgment—from anyone.

Most men who will see this are decent, rational guys who will sympathize with my feelings.  A small, vocal handful of dudes will send me private messages about how women like me can’t “take a fucking compliment.”  This is not for either of you.  This is for the guys who don’t know yet that attracting unwanted attention doesn’t make women feel good, no matter how nice their intentions are.  I can’t speak for everyone, but I can say that I personally get embarrassed, often scared, and always—ALWAYS—ashamed, in some way, in how I look.

So… now that you know, cut it out.  Tell all the girls how nice they are and how amazing they are at their jobs instead.

THIS

I never had to deal with this shit from guys until I started college.  It can be scary at times too. When you are walking alone and a car slows down (even for just a moment) to yell or honk at you.  

No. Cut that shit out. 


fuckyeahlaughters:

adrifts:

The original “March of Progress” image is one of the best known scientific illustrations in the world and Maentis.com is remixing it, 2012-style, 99 times over. The 99 Steps of Progress, coming out of the Paris based artist collective Maentis, is a release of 99 re-imagined versions over the course of the next 99 days.

The designs make a statement on our journey as a society from neanderthal (in the original image) to our present forms (whatever they may be). The designs poke fun at the jarring shifts in lifestyle we are seeing today as the landscape of pop culture continually evolves. Although not always a positive step forward, (wittingly implied in the name, 99 Steps of “Progress”) the designs make a case for reflection on our own progress as we go through life. The stylized silhouette images provide a treat for the eyes as well!

(via The March of Progress Re-imagined)

oh


anarcho-queer:

Series of Brooklyn Billboards Put Racial Inequity on Display

Billboards are everywhere in New York City. They’re on subway trains and in stations, and on top of and inside taxis. But few, if any, have been anything like a series of anonymous billboards that have popped up on bus shelters in the Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood of Brooklyn. They’re not selling anything but a delcaration: that racism still exists.

That’s also the name of the appropriately titled campaign. At least half a dozen billboard sites have sprung up around the neighborhood since August, with each month dedicated to highlighting racial disparities that impact black people in America. So far, the billboards have touched on topics ranging from the entertainment industry, education, fast food, smoking, policing, and black wealth. Each month’s billboard is also accompanied by an detailed post on Tumblr that provides background information, news articles, studies, charts, and statistics to back up each claim. 

A brief statement on the Tumblr page says, in part, that “RISE is a proejct designed to illuminate some of the ways in which racism operates in this country.” But who’s behind the project remains a mystery.

For the time being, the project seems dedicated to its anonymity. Both the Tumblr page and the billboards themselves are devoid of any contact information. Similarly, the private advertising company that’s contracted by New York City’s transit agency to host advertisments and billboards said that it does not give out information about who paid for the advertisements. 

Even local activists who spend their time dedicated to working on racial justice issues can’t figure out who’s behind the billboards. Nonetheless, they’re intrigued by the campaign. This month’s billboard is dedicated to Stop-and-Frisk, the controversial NYPD tactic that’s drawn national criticism for its disproportionate impact on black and Latino men. The billboard’s provactive text reads, “Don’t want to get stopped by the NYPD? Stop being black.” On the heels of New York City’s 2013 mayoral race and the prominent role that critics of Stop-and-Frisk have taken in city politics, the billboards have become a meaningful part of local discussion.

It’s no accident that of all of New York City’s neighborhoods, the billboards have targeted this one. A historically black neighborhood, Bed-Stuy has become one of the most contested spaces in New York City. A 2012 study from the Fordham Institute found that Brooklyn is home to 25 of the country’s most rapidly gentrifying zip codes. That’s created a stark contrast between those in the neighborhood who have more upward social and economic mobility than others. Several high profile media accounts have recently noted Bed Stuy’s so-called “hip” transformation and “resurgence”, but the borough’s medium per capita income in 2009 was just $23,000, which was $10,000 below the national average.

The content of the billboard’s messaging may not exactly be news for most residents, but the presentation has nonetheless been powerful.

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